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  • Irankarapte: An Introduction to Ainu Culture in Japan with Dr. Christina M. Spiker

Irankarapte: An Introduction to Ainu Culture in Japan with Dr. Christina M. Spiker

  • 2020-09-03
  • 18:00 - 19:00
  • Webinar
  • 14

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We are delighted to announce a webinar about the Ainu, an indigenous people of Japan, by Dr. Christina Spiker, a Visiting Assistant Professor of Art and Art History at St. Olaf College on Thursday, September 3.

Please mark your calendar and join us to learn about the Ainu.


“Irankarapte” is an Ainu greeting. While often translated as “hello,” it means “allow me to touch your heart.” The Ainu are an indigenous people of Japan with their own language, religion, and cultural identity. Together with Dr. Christina Spiker, explore the development of Ainu culture and history through art, language, and material artifacts. This webinar will examine both historical and contemporary aspects of Ainu culture, including the surprising ways that Ainu and American history intersect in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. We will also explore the recent 2020 opening of the new national museum dedicated to the Ainu in Shiraoi, Hokkaido, and Ainu representation in popular media.

$8: Non-Member

Free: JASM Members

Fee is not refundable but is transferable. Please become a member to support JASM.


Please support JASM to continue with our mission and activities.

Christina M. Spiker is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Art and Art History at St. Olaf College. She received her Ph. D. in Visual Studies from the University of California, Irvine with a specialization in modern Japanese art and visual culture. Her dissertation explored turn-of-the-twentieth-century representations of the indigenous Ainu in Japan. Her research continues to investigate how their specific histories intersect with theories of globalization, modernity, and travel from the late nineteenth century until today. She published “‘Civilized’ Men and ‘Superstitious’ Women: Visualizing the Hokkaido Ainu in Isabella Bird’s Unbeaten Tracks, 1880” in Gender, Continuity, and the Shaping of Modernity in the Arts of East Asia, 16th-20th Centuries (Brill, 2017) and is the creator of the online project Mapping Isabella Bird: Geolocation and Unbeaten Tracks in Japan (1880). Her latest research includes examining contemporary Ainu visual representation in Japanese anime and manga.


Location

Japan America Society of Minnesota

Riverplace EH-131, 43 Main Street SE

Minneapolis, MN 55414

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T 612.627.9357

F 612.379.2393

E jasm@us-japan.org

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